Kevin Love Hubbard ’12 Promoted to Partner at Medina Orthwein LLP

Yale alumni-owned law firm Medina Orthwein LLP has expanded its partner base to include Kevin Love Hubbard ’12, formerly a Senior Associate with the firm. Founding Partner Felicia Medina ’06 met Kevin at Yale Law School.

“Kevin has been instrumental in our success as a new and thriving civil rights law firm. He is a consummate professional, trial attorney, and legal writer who is willing to push the law with me and Jen Orthwein as far as we can take it, and then some. I am overjoyed that Kevin is now my law partner and that we have many more years ahead of us to fight power with power for our communities,” said Medina.

Prior to joining Medina Orthwein LLP in September 2017, Hubbard clerked in the United States District Court for the District of Arizona for the Honorable Neil V. Wake, and then joined Morrison & Foerster LLP, also where Medina first started her legal career.

At Medina Orthwein, Hubbard has played a key role in cutting-edge litigation on behalf of marginalized clients, including people of color in technology and biotech, working mothers, whistleblowers, victims of police brutality, and transgender clients whose consitutional rights have been violated.  Hubbard has settled and litigated dozens of legal disputes and expanded his management and supervision responsibilities within the firm. Though he is based in the Bay Area, Hubbard maintains membership in the Massachusetts Bar, giving Medina Orthwein LLP a bicoastal litigation presence.

“I am very grateful that Felicia and Jen have brought me into the partnership of this unique queer-owned firm, where our lived experiences push us to think about what the law should be,” said Hubbard.  “We do so as we use our knowledge and resources of what the law is to represent our courageous clients and amplify their voices in disputes with powerful adversaries,” said Hubbard. “I look forward to continuing to expand on Medina Orthwein’s success and reaching more ground-breaking results for our clients.”

In a short amount of time, Medina, Orthwein, and Hubbard have successfully litigated and resolved a whistleblower case involving transphobia in the CA prison system, settled three class actions, caused a university to publicly apologize for its anti-blackness, expanded their entertainment transactional practice, and secured a precedent-setting order in a civil rights case for a Black transgender woman who was a victim of a hate crime while incarcerated.

“Kevin’s powerful litigation skills and compelling arguments propelled us through a crucial hurdle to prevail on both a Motion to Dismiss and Motion for Misjoinder in Crowder v. Fox, said Jen Orthwein. “He paved the way for the judge to issue an unprecedented decision in favor of antidiscimination protections for transgender people, both inside and outside prison.”

This article by originally appeared in Yale Law School News on February 6th, 2020.